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    May 21, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Education, BS


Students completing the requirements for the undergraduate degree will receive the Bachelor of Science with a major in education. The undergraduate program requires a minimum of 120 semester hours.  

This degree centers on the professional interests and personal curiosity of students who are studying to be teachers. There are many places in this degree for students to choose courses based on their interests and their goals for their career as teachers. It is the intention of this degree to set beginning teachers/future educators on a life-long career path of self-selected professional learning.  

The last three long semesters of this degree are structured using a block model and must be taken in sequence. Block A signals the entry into the professional development sequence and students must be admitted to Teacher Education in order to enroll in Block A courses. Students must be in good standing to continue into Block B and C.  

Students make decisions about which specialization area they want to work inside; their first course in their specialization is taken prior to Block A.  

Block A is the first semester of this three semester sequence; some courses contain required field experiences. Students take two more courses associated with their specialization area in Block A. Block B is the second semester of the sequence and involves two days each week of coursework and two days of field experience working in classrooms at a local school district or community partnering site. In addition, students are expected to attend and participate in regular seminars associated with the field experiences. The final semester, Block C, is the Clinical Teaching semester. Students are expected to participate in 14-weeks of full-time student teaching plus attendance at a weekly seminar. As per State regulations, students must participate in an “intensive start of school field experience” in either Block B or C.  

All courses in Blocks A, B and C are organized into cohorts and students must enroll in courses with their associated cohort.  

Students seeking certification as a bilingual or special education teacher will not participate in specializations. Rather, specific coursework prepares them for their respective certifications.  

NOTE: As of 12/23/2020, UNT discontinued admissions to Grade 4-8 certification programs. All students admitted to 4-8 programs prior to 12/23/2020 will be able to complete their certification program as described in the Catalog under which they were admitted.  

Degree requirements

Students must be admitted to the Teacher Education (TEd) Program before enrolling courses in Blocks A and B and must be admitted to clinical teaching before enrolling in Block C. In addition, students must maintain a 2.75 GPA in various sub-areas of their degree audit (i.e., university core, academic major and education courses) in order to be eligible for Blocks A, B and C. Students seeking EC–6 teacher certification must also earn grades of C or above in all required courses on their degree audit. Contact the College of Education Student Advising Office, 940-565-2736; Matthews Hall, Room 105; or coe.unt.edu/student-advising for details and to apply for admission to the Teacher Education program.

Hours required and general/college requirements


A minimum of 120 semester hours, of which 42 must be 3000 or 4000 level courses, and fulfillment of degree requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree as specified in the University Core Curriculum  in the Academics  section of this catalog and the College of Education degree requirements .

The department recommends specific courses (best choices) in some categories. Students may elect to take other courses listed under the University Core Curriculum  to fulfill these requirements; however, doing so may add hours to the degree.

Students should consult with their advisors to determine how best to meet the core requirements.

 

Degree requirements include the following:

  EC-6 w/ ESL EC-6 w/Bilingual EC-6 w/Special Education
Texas Core 42 42 42
Education Core 42 42 42
Specializations/Certifications 9 12 15
Free electives 9 6 3
Electives outside College of Education 9 (9; must include SPAN 3800) 9
Clinical Teaching (includes 6 hours for student teaching plus EDEE 4890 ) 9 9 9

Major requirements


Early Childhood through Grade Six (EC–6) core subjects teacher certification options


Students may prepare for the following certifications:

  • (a) Core subjects EC-6 with Science of Teaching Reading and ESL Supplemental.
  • (b) Core subjects EC-6 with Science of Teaching Reading and Bilingual Education Supplemental - Spanish (Grades EC-12).
    or
  • (c) Core subjects EC-6 with Science of Teaching Reading with EC-12 Special Education.

Students should consult with their advisors to determine the best sequence for taking core courses, prerequisite courses, major courses and courses in the blocks. Part of this degree is the last three long semesters of the professional development sequence (called Blocks: A, B and C). Courses in Block A may/not require field experiences at local early childhood education centers, elementary schools, and partnering community organizations. Additionally, the final two long semesters (Blocks B & C) involve full-day internship experiences at local schools.

Early Childhood Education specialization

Children’s experiences during their early years are foundational to build their social and emotional well-being and academic learning. Understanding young children’s ways of being and knowing is essential to creating environments and nurturing relationships in the classroom that sustain children’s cultures. A major focus of this specialization is to re-imagine early childhood education, which involves a re-humanizing  processes of education for young children and includes  children in the movement for social justice and equity. 

The faculty working in this specialization look to a future in which young children are viewed and treated as intellectual and social agents who are knowledge-producers and complex cultural beings. Our goal is to provide early childhood educators with the tools to see children in more expansive ways. These ways of seeing and knowing young children on their own terms can support the critical reconceptualize of pedagogies, practices and policies that impact the lives and identities of young children, particularly those from communities of color, considering the intersectionality of  race, ethnicity, culture, languages, abilities, gender, and other identity markers.  We also examine relationships children have with technology and the  natural world around them in order to consider our collective role in ecological justice. This specialization is aligned with the core commitments of the program.

 

There are three courses required for this specialization: 

Ethnic Studies specialization

The goal of this specialization is to prepare future educators to teach about race and ethnicity by focusing on the experiences, histories and perspectives of people of color in the United States. Preservice teachers will explore the ways in which race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration status, dis/ability intersect and have been and continue to be, powerful forces that impact the experiences of people of color, especially children. The focus will be to prepare educators to create and teach a curriculum that centers the knowledge and experiences of children of color and work alongside culturally and linguistically diverse children and communities.   

This specialization program takes on an interdisciplinary approach with critical theoretical foundations that explores historical and contemporary issues that explore factors that interrogate the relationships between social, historical, cultural and political contexts that are focused on the lives, experiences and needs of historically marginalized communities. Through this specialization, educators will develop an understanding of and utilize theoretical frameworks that promote the reconstruction of education that reflects critical race, Black feminist, raciolinguistics, multicultural, Indigenous and queer theories on education. Through the experiences in this specialization, future educators will see themselves as part of an abolitionist community of co-conspirators who seek to restore humanity back in teaching and learning. This specialization is aligned with the core commitments of the program.

There are three courses required for this specialization: 

Inclusive Education specialization

This specialization offers future educators a deep dive into building inclusive education, opportunities, equity and access in partnership with students with dis/abilities and their families. Taking a socio-historical perspective, students will critically analyze systems of oppression for students with disabilities and build advocacy skills that will help elevate the voice of children and youth with dis/abilities from a strengths-based perspective and with an intersectional and culturally relevant lens. Pragmatic skills include how to navigate special education and school systems, develop inclusive pedagogies, implement evidence-based practices and build accessible communities to revolutionize inclusive education in schools.  

The specialization seeks to amplify the voices of students and individuals with dis/abilities, especially those diverse racial/ethnic, cultural, linguistic and socio-economic communities. The goal of the Inclusive Education specialization is to reimagine, redesign and implement inclusive education in our schools and communities. This specialization is aligned with the core commitments of the program.   

Note: The completion of this specialization is not the same as completing the program for special education certification. Students interested in a special education certification should see their advisor.  

There are three courses required for this specialization: 

Interdisciplinary Studies in Education specialization

School curriculum and instruction often derives its content and methods from disciplines in the social and physical sciences. In this specialization, students will consider how disciplines exert control over school curriculum, to whose advantage and disadvantage, and the benefits and drawbacks of interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies. A definition of interdisciplinary understanding is to “…integrate knowledge and modes of thinking from two or more disciplines (or well established fields of study) in order to create products, raise questions, solve problems, and offer explanations of the world around them in ways that would not have been possible through single disciplinary means” (adapted from Boix Mansilla & Gardner, 1996). The course will examine how knowledge is produced and for whose benefit. The course will consequently center social and educational justice as a lens and outcome. This specialization is aligned with the core commitments of the program.

The aims of the specialization include:

  • Demonstrate the ability to be a critical consumer and producer of curriculum, pedagogy and research;
  • Demonstrate how disciplinary, interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, approaches to schooling might support social and educational equity;
  • Demonstrate how interdisciplinary studies might be applied to classroom teaching in K-6 settings;
  • Synthesize research on interdisciplinary approaches and their educational and social impact on students and communities; and
  • Integrate technology as is appropriate, ethical and just.

This specialization offers considerable flexibility. There is one required course for this specialization:

  • EDEE 3300 - Interdisciplinary Studies in Education  (taken during Block A, has a field experience component, and serves as the centering course)  
  • Two other courses are selected by the future educator from the other specializations (Early Childhood; Ethnic Studies; International Studies; Language, Literacy, and Activism; STEAM Education; Inclusive Education; and others as they are available).
International Studies in Education specialization

Rapid changes in technology and human mobility challenge educators to prepare critically aware cosmopolitans: citizens of the world who respect the dignity of all human beings. Students who choose this specialization will consider what it means to become globally competent teachers of empowered, globally aware citizens. Students will investigate the world, recognize perspectives, communicate ideas and act while exploring education and schooling from an international perspective.

This area includes a broad focus on global issues such as interconnectedness, communication and cultural exchange, connections between the local and global, cosmopolitan practices, migration patterns and policies affecting migrant populations, and equity in economic development, educational access and health and well-being.

Emphasizing critical and decolonizing perspectives, supporting coursework will build understanding and enhance knowledge of local-global citizenship; diverse cultures, interculturality and cultural competence; and educational policies and systems and teaching practices.

Students enrolled in this specialization are encouraged, but not required, to engage in study abroad and/or other international experiences. Opportunities for in-person and/or virtual exchange will be embedded in coursework. This specialization is aligned with the core commitments of the program.  

There are three courses required for this specialization:

Language, Literacy and Activism specialization

Literacy is the curriculum area that receives the most attention in elementary schools. Engaging children/youth in the language arts is essential work for teachers in classrooms and therefore a major focus in quality preparation programs. Language, Literacy and Activism in Teaching is the only specialization option that is directly tied to a required certification examination (i.e., the Science of Teaching Reading) that all preservice teachers must take and pass for certification. The focus on multilingual children in this specialization will also serve as additional preparation in working with children/youth who are emerging bilingual people.

The faculty working in this specialization are particularly focused on working with children/youth, families and communities that represent diverse racial, ethnic, linguistic, cultural and economic experiences. Consistent with the core values and commitments in the preparation program, the goal of this specialization is to prepare future teachers to engage in transformative instructional literacy practices that position all children as capable and curious. We emphasize activism as central to the work of teachers who engage children/youth with the world around them as to promote equity, especially for children/youth from families and communities of color, who have been historically denied equitable educational opportunities. 

There are three courses required for this specialization:

STEAM Education Specialization

This specialization introduces future teachers to the discipline of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) as a way of designing integrated learning environments for purposes of equity in education. Future teachers enrolled in these courses will explore innovative venues for STEAM learning and teaching with an emphasis on diversity and equity. Consistent with the core commitments in this preparation program, future teachers will engage in transformative STEAM practices to foster and grow STEAM education in schools. This specialization emphasizes social justice and activism as central to the work of teachers engaging children/youth with the world around them through STEAM practices that promote equity. Future teachers in this specialization will learn methods of learning and teaching science and math that are equity and asset-based, rigorous, foster children’s positive mathematics and science identity development, and transform classrooms into spaces that challenge marginalizing processes and use STEAM practices as a tool to critically examine the world.

There are three courses required for this specialization:

Internship (student teaching), 6 hours


Students seeking certification in (a) core subjects EC-6 with Science of Teaching Reading and ESL Supplemental or (b) core subjects EC-6 with Science of Teaching Reading and Bilingual Education Supplemental - Spanish (Grades EC-12) will enroll in the following courses: 

Students seeking certification in core subjects EC-6 with Science of Teaching Reading with EC-12 Special Education will enroll in the following courses: 

Minor requirements


There is no minor for this degree.

Electives outside the College of Education


Students take 9 hours of electives outside the College of Education. Students should talk to their advisor about which courses work well with their areas of interest, specialization areas, and/or certification path. SPAN 3080  is required as one of these “outside” courses for students seeking certification as a bilingual teacher. 

Free choice electives


Students can take between 3 and 9 hours of free electives. The following applies to the various certifications:

  • Students who are seeking EC-6 with ESL certification can take 9 hours of free electives;
  • Students who are seeking bilingual certification can take 6 hours of free electives;
  • Students who are seeking certification as special education teachers can take 3 hours of electives.

These free electives can come from within the Department of Teacher Education & Administration, the College of Education, or any other college at UNT.

Other requirements


Admission to elementary teacher education

For admission to elementary teacher education, a student must have: 

  1. Completed a minimum of 60 semester hours;  

  1. 2.75 UNT GPA;  

  1. 2.75 overall GPA (includes all transferred and UNT courses); 

  1. Appropriate exam scores on either the ACT or SAT, or TSI Complete; (contact the Student Advising Office in Matthews Hall, Room 105, for further information on the exam requirement); 

  2. Receive a score of “Accepted” on the Admissions Interview Questionnaire.  

Contact the College of Education Student Advising Office, 940-565-2736; Matthews Hall, Room 105; or https://coe.unt.edu/student-advising for details on the application process. See the College of Education’s calendar for application deadlines.  

Students seeking EC–6 teacher certification must also earn grades of C or above in all required courses on their degree audit. 

 

Admission to Clinical Practice 

In order to be accepted into Clinical Practice, students must,  

  1. Apply to Clinical Practice during Block A but before Block B (see College of Education calendar for application deadlines). Clinical Practice Application periods are posted on the Clinical Practice Office (calendar: https://coe.unt.edu/educator-preparation-office/clinical);  

  1. Have completed all TX General Core courses with no grade lower than a C;  

  1. Have at least a 2.75 GPA in the academic major and for overall UNT GPA, with no grade lower than a “C” in the academic major;  

  1. Have at least an average of 2.75 GPA in core, academic major, teaching field courses, and pedagogy (education) courses;  

  1. Have a grade of at least a C in all courses required for graduation;  

  1. Except for Block A courses, have all required courses completed (except for those in Blocks B and C);  

  1. Submit a Statement of Qualification Form prior. Forms are available here: https://coe.unt.edu/educator-preparation-office/clinical. This form must be approved by your academic advisor prior to submission; and 

  1. Have completed a UNT-sponsored TExES Certification Practice Exams for all certification areas relevant to the degree plan. Practice exams are scheduled by the TExES Success Office. Information about the practice exams is located at https://coe.unt.edu/educator-preparation-office/texes.  

 

Contact the Educator Preparation Office, Matthews Hall, Room 119; 940-369-8411; or https://coe.unt.edu/educator-preparation-office for additional information. 

 

Admission to secondary or all-level teacher education 

For admission to secondary or all-level teacher education, a student must have: 

  1. Junior standing (60 credit hours earned); 

  1. 2.75 UNT GPA; 

  1. 2.75 overall GPA (includes all transferred and UNT courses); 

  1. Appropriate exam scores on either the ACT, SAT or Praxis Core: Academic Skills for Educators; (contact the Student Advising Office in Matthews Hall, Room 105, for further information on the exam requirement); 

  1. A rating of “Accepted” on the online Admission Interview Questionnaire (for all students except all-level art and music); 

  1. Active enrollment at UNT and an official degree audit on file in the College of Education Student Advising Office; and 

  1. A completed application for admission to Teacher Education submitted to the College of Education Student Advising Office once all requirements are complete. 

Students must be admitted to teacher education before enrolling in most education classes. In addition, students must maintain a 2.75 GPA in various sub-areas of their degree audit (i.e., teaching field and education/pedagogy courses) in order to proceed with early field experience and student teaching. 

Contact the College of Education Student Advising Office, 940-565-2736; Matthews Hall, Room 105; or www.coe.unt.edu/sao for additional information. 

 

Eligibility for Recommendation for Teacher Certification  

Teacher certification is granted by the Texas Education Agency (TEA), not UNT. As an approved State of Texas Educator Preparation Program, UNT can only recommend students for certification. Completion of the bachelor’s degree and the required education courses does not necessarily result in certification by TEA. In order to be recommended for teacher certification through the University of North Texas, students must have:  

  • Successfully completed an approved teacher education program for the preparation of early childhood, secondary or all-level teachers; 

  • Successfully completed clinical teaching, including attendance at required seminars; and  

  • Passed the TExES EC-12 Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) and all required content and supplemental certification exams of the Texas Examinations of Educator Standards (TExES), as applicable.  

Access to register for Texas teacher certification exams (TExES) is only granted to students who have been formally admitted to the Teacher Education program at UNT. Teacher candidates (who have been admitted to TEd) must take UNT-sponsored TExES practice exams prior to the start of Block B courses. Practice exams are free of charge.  

The TExES Practice exams are offered four times in each long semester and twice during the summer.  

Contact the TExES Success Office In Matthews Hall 119 at 940-369-8601 or COE_TSO@unt.edu for information about registering for your practice TExES Exams, TEAL account setup and for information and study resources for your actual certification exams. 

Four-year degree plan (example)


The following four-year plan is one example of a variety of ways in which you can complete your chosen degree in four years, and will serve as a guide for you to design your pathway to degree completion. Variations will depend on whether you need to take prerequisites or have college credit from exams or dual enrollment.

Year 1

Semester 1 Semester 2
EDEC 1010 - Learning With and From Children   3 hours   EDEE 1010 - Teaching as Advocacy for Equity   3 hours  
Communication core   3 hours  Communication core   3 hours
Life and Physical Sciences core   3 hours Life and Physical Sciences core   3 hours
American History core   3 hours American History core   3 hours
Social and Behavioral Sciences core   3 hours Creative Arts core   3 hours
Total 15 hours Total 15 hours

 

Year 2

Semester 1 Semester 2
EDLE 2010 - How Schools Work   1.5 hours   COUN 2600 - Culture-Centered Social and Emotional Learning in the Schools   1.5 hours  
EPSY 2010 - How People Learn   1.5 hours   EDBE 2050 - Understanding and Teaching Multilingual Students   3 hours  
Component Area Option A core   3 hours  LTEC 2600 - Digital Tools in Education   1.5 hours  
Government/Political Science core   3 hours  Component Area Option B core   3 hours 
Language, Philosophy and Culture core   3 hours Government/Political Science core   3 hours
Mathematics core   3 hours  Non-COE Elective 3 hours 
    Non-COE Elective 3 hours
Total 15 hours Total 18 hours

 

Year 3

Semester 1 Semester 2
EDBE 3050 - Teaching English as an Additional Language   3 hours    EDEC 3700 - Pedagogies and Practices of Early Childhood   3 hours  
EDEC 3613 - Childhoods Across Time, Space and Place   3 hours   EDEC 3750 - Young Children in Schools, Families and Communities   3 hours  
Non-COE Elective 3 hours  EDEE 3330 - Teaching Science EC-6   3 hours  
Elective 3 hours  EDEE 3340 - Teaching Social Studies EC–6   3 hours  
Elective 3 hours  EDRE 3350 - Early Language and Literacy Development   3 hours  
Elective 3 hours    
Total 18 hours Total 15 hours

 

Year 4

Semester 1 Semester 2
EDCI 4010 - Classrooms as Communities   3 hours   EDEE 4101 - Clinical Teaching   3 hours  
EDEE 3350 - Teaching Mathematics EC-6   3 hours   EDEE 4102 - Clinical Teaching   3 hours  
EDRE 4850 - Teaching the Tools and Practices of Reading Across the Curriculum   3 hours   EDEE 4890 - Practice-Based Research   3 hours  
EDRE 4860 - Teaching the Tools and Practices of Writing across the Curriculum   3 hours      
EDSP 4350 - Strategies to Support Diverse Learners in General Education   3 hours      
Total 15 hours  Total 9 hours